Prison/School

Paleo Retiree writes:

Which is the prison, which is the school?

blog_prison_or_school01

blog_prison_or_school02

Shouldn’t the architecture be giving us more of a hint than it is? And why do we sentence children to spend many years of long days in buildings that might as well be prisons?

About Paleo Retiree

Onetime media flunky and movie buff and very glad to have left that mess behind. Formerly Michael Blowhard of the cultureblog 2Blowhards.com. Now a rootless parasite and bon vivant on a quest to find the perfectly-crafted artisanal cocktail.
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4 Responses to Prison/School

  1. Answer: the first pic is of a random mid-American school, taken from Google Maps. The second pic is of Butner Federal Correctional Complex in North Carolina.

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  2. Bryan says:

    Reminds me of a line from Buffy: when asked how was school, Dawn replies, “a big, square building filled with boredom and despair.” Sums it up rather well.

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  3. agnostic says:

    Jeez, the sky itself has fallen ill from having to stare on that dreary school day-in and day-out.

    In case anyone else needs a little cheering up, check out this photo-thon of Denver public schools from the Jazz Age. Raise your kids out in the mountain west, and spare them the mind-mushifying monotony of school life in New Scandinavia.

    http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=197209

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  4. agnostic says:

    Look at how isolated that school is, too. It’s not enough to lock the poor kids indoors all day long — it has to be in some desolate wasteland too. Otherwise they might get distracted by signs of life and activity outside. Is there a neighborhood, park, pool, shopping center, or anything at all nearby?

    Parents will gripe that it takes them longer to drive out to the middle of nowhere for drop-off and pick-up, but that’s a small price to pay in order to seal their child in a cocoon away from Outside Influences. Then when their kids emerge in a still-larval state, they complain about the schools failing to properly incubate their children — instead of, y’know, letting your kids grow up by themselves like you did.

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