Category Archives: Movies

Notes on “Summer Interlude”

Fabrizio del Wrongo writes: A ballerina (Maj-Britt Nilsson), disappointed in love and aging out of dance, impulsively visits an island on which, as a teen, she spent a summer vacation. As she wanders, so does her mind; she remembers her … Continue reading

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Notes on “Enchanted April”

Fabrizio del Wrongo writes:The effectiveness of the 1991 “Enchanted April” is an upshot of its subtlety, its lightness of touch. Director Mike Newell resists making statements or following through on obvious setups. Even the screenplay’s twists seem less like engineered … Continue reading

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Notes on “At Eternity’s Gate”

Fabrizio del Wrongo writes: It’s inevitable that Julian Schnabel’s movie about Van Gogh, “At Eternity’s Gate,” will be compared to Altman’s “Vincent and Theo.” Both pictures attempt to capture the ecstatically enervated aspects of Van Gogh’s art; they’re expressionistic takes … Continue reading

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Notes on “Atlantic City”

Fabrizio del Wrongo writes: Like “Nashville,” the 1980 “Atlantic City” is an essayistic treatment of a city. But it’s not brash and satirical like “Nasvhille”; it’s glancing and melancholy-romantic — a loser’s lament. It’s to director Louis Malle’s and writer … Continue reading

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Notes on “Redoubtable”

Fabrizio del Wrongo writes: “Redoubtable” is a demystification of Jean-Luc Godard and a dramatization of his turn to radical politics. Director Michel Hazanavicius lacks the ferocity and lightning wit of the artist he’s spoofing, but his somewhat plodding covers of … Continue reading

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Notes on “Lifeguard”

Fabrizio del Wrongo writes: The 1976 “Lifeguard” plays like a major-studio version of a CIP quickie. Its pleasures are CIP pleasures: unthought-out scenes of everyday people doing everyday things set against a backdrop that’s the more titillating for its relatability, … Continue reading

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Notes on “War and Peace”

Fabrizio del Wrongo writes: I spent much of the 431-minute running time of Sergei Bondarchuk’s 1966 “War and Peace” wondering if spectacle, in and of itself, can be considered a kind of art. “War and Peace” doesn’t work as drama, … Continue reading

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