“Blacula”

Paleo Retiree writes:

blacula

Early blaxploitation, directed by William Crain and starring William Marshall as an 18th century African prince who, bitten by Count Dracula, wakes up in 1971 L.A. It’s a surprisingly straightfaced movie — far less of a spoof or a goof than I expected, with Marshall giving a genuinely suave, dignified and intense performance. That said, on the technical and budget level the film is like cheesy ’70s TV. I enjoyed the picture’s gaudiness, its performers (among them: Vonetta McGee, Thalmus Rasulala, and Charles Macaulay), its style and sensibility, and its unhurried storytelling … until the climactic action scenes, which, alas, I found dull, and which finally put me to sleep.

Related

  • Amazon Prime members can stream the movie for free.
  • William Marshall stood 6’5″ tall, and was a director and an opera singer as well as an actor. Judging just from his work in “Blacula,” he was a major talent.
  • Buy a DVD including both “Blacula” and its sequel, “Scream, Blacula, Scream,” for $8.99.

About Paleo Retiree

Onetime media flunky and movie buff and very glad to have left that mess behind. Formerly Michael Blowhard of the cultureblog 2Blowhards.com. Now a rootless parasite and bon vivant on a quest to find the perfectly-crafted artisanal cocktail.
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2 Responses to “Blacula”

  1. Toddy Cat says:

    The early Seventies were one of the weirdest eras in American popular culture, no? Every once in a while, I remember or am reminded of something like “Blackula” and think, “Holy Crap! Did they really make that?” Nice to be remthat the seventies were just as odd, disorienting, tasteless, and (in an odd way) as fun as I remember them.

    Like

  2. Pingback: BROTHERZ (1977) | Moorbey'z Blog

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